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Emma x

Category: Dessert

The Hobbit – Honey Cake with Catalan Cream and Lemon Curd

The Hobbit – Honey Cake with Catalan Cream and Lemon Curd

“THERE WAS A BUZZING AND A WHIRRING AND A DRONING IN THE AIR. BEES WERE EVERYWHERE. AND SUCH BEES! BILBO HAD NEVER SEEN ANYTHING LIKE THEM.”

I have to confess to being a huge Tolkien fan, and so either LOTR, The Saumarillion, or The Hobbit had to pop up on here sooner or later this month. Whilst I’ve taken The Hobbit as specific inspiration for this one, you could say that it’s generally a Middle Earth inspired dessert.

When thinking about making a Hobbit-inspired dish you’d probably expect some kind of ring cake, or generally a ring-shaped thing. So you may be wondering why I’ve made a honey bee out of cake instead? Well there is a reason. When Gandalf, Bilbo and the dwarfs end up staying at Beorn’s home before departing for Mirkwood (sorry to anyone who hasn’t read/seen The Hobbit), there’s lengthy descriptions about the gigantic honey bees in the garden which really hit my imagination, and therefore I’ve gone bee-themed for this one. As a parting gift Beorn also gives the company jars of honey from his bees to nourish them on the trip and anyone who’s seen the film might remember the big fuzzy bees swarming around the barn as they run in.

Whilst Middle Earth inspired the components of the dish, it was my trip to the Edinburgh Fringe a couple of years ago that inspired the flavours. Whilst up there I went to this amazing ice-cream shop which always had a selection of really interesting flavours. One day I had the lemon, honey and black sesame ice-cream and it was sublime! So, as a result, lemon, honey and sesame all feature in here. There was also this really cute campervan at the festival that sold little creme brulees and Catalan creams (basically creme brulees flavoured with lemon and cinnamon). This inspired me to fill my honey bee with some Catalan cream, set with gelatin, and then caramelise sugar on either end. You could also fill the cake with pannacotta, mousse or jelly if you’d prefer!

Recipe

Makes 2 Bees (but leaves some leftover cake and biscuits to nibble on!)

Time: 2 1/2 hours, plus setting time

Ingredients

For the Décor paste

  • 114g Unsalted butter
  • 114g Icing sugar
  • 2 Large egg whites
  • 90g Plain flour
  • 40g Cocoa powder
  • A few drops of black food colouring (optional)

For the Honey cake

  • 50g Butter
  • 20g Runny honey
  • 110g Self raising flour, sifted
  • ½ tsp Baking powder
  • 2 Large eggs
  • 120g Caster sugar

For the Catalan cream

  • 335ml Whole milk
  • 50g Black sesame seeds, plus extra to garnish
  • 1 Cinnamon stick
  • 2 leaves of Gelatin
  • Zest of 1 Lemon
  • 1 tsp Vanilla bean paste
  • 200g Caster sugar, plus extra for caramelising
  • 1 ½ tbsp Cornflour
  • 2 Medium egg yolks

For the Honey tuile

  • 20g Runny honey
  • 30g Unsalted butter
  • 1 Egg white
  • A few drops of Vanilla extract
  • A pinch of Salt
  • 3tbsp Plain flour

To Decorate

  • Lemon curd
  • 1/2 Lemon, cut into little pieces
  • Fresh Mint leaves
  • Freeze dried raspberries (optional)

Method

  1. Line a 38x26cm tin with butter and baking paper. Pre-heat the oven to 160˚C.
  2. Begin by making the décor paste that’ll make the stripes on your bees. Put the butter and icing sugar into a bowl and cream them together until smooth. Add the egg whites and whisk until combined. Then add the flour, cocoa powder and food colouring (if you’re using it) and mix together until a uniform colour and smooth.
  3. Pour the batter into a piping bag with a small, round nozzle. Then pipe lines horizontally across the lined tin, about 2cm apart, to make your stripes. Leave the tin the freezer for at least 20 minutes, or until needed.
  4. Now make the honey cake. Put the butter, honey, flour, baking powder, eggs and sugar into a bowl and whisk until combined – an electric whisk here can make things easier!
  5. Pour the cake mixture over the stripes in your tin and smooth the mixture out so it’s an even layer. Then bake the cake in the oven for 15-20 minutes, until puffed up, golden brown and so that the cake springs back when it’s poked gently.
  6. Meanwhile take 2, 6 ½ cm diameter metal rings. Grease them with butter and then line them with clingfilm.
  7. When baked, turn the cake sheet out onto a wire rack and remove the baking paper. Quickly cut the cake into strips, following the lines of the stripes (so not cutting across the stripes). The width of the strips should be the same as the height of your metal rings.
  8.  Take one of the still warm cake strips and fit it into the ring. To make a tight fit you might need to cut the strip to make it shorter, but do this carefully as you need the cake to fully wrap around the inside of the ring. Repeat with the other ring and then leave to one side for later.
  9. Next make the Catalan cream. Take a large saucepan and put in the milk, cinnamon, lemon rind, sesame seeds, and vanilla. Bring to the boil and then leave to simmer for a couple of minutes. Sieve the milk to remove the sesame seeds and then pop to one side.
  10. Put the gelatin into a bowl with some cold water and leave for at least 5 minutes until soft and flexible.
  11. In another bowl whisk the egg yolks, cornflour and 150g of the sugar until thick and creamy. Slowly pour the milk into the mix, whisking constantly until smooth.
  12. Pour the mixture back into the pan and place over a medium heat. Stir the mixture constantly until it beings to thicken. Add the gelatin to the mix and whisk in until dissolved. Then take the pan off the heat and leave to cool until luke warm.
  13. Carefully pour the cooled cream mixture into the rings lined with the cake and leave to set in the fridge for at least 3 hours, or better still overnight.
  14. Now make the tuiles. Put the butter and honey into a bowl and mix together until smooth. Add the egg white, vanilla and a pinch of salt. Then add the flour and mix again until all combined.
  15. Take a sheet of acetate (or you can improvise straight onto a baking sheet) and cut out a wing shape with a scalpel. Line 2 baking trays with baking paper.
  16. Place your stencil onto your baking tray. Then dollop 1 tsp of the tuile mixture onto the space in the stencil (you don’t need very much). Take a palette knife and smooth the mixture over the gap and then sweep the knife across the stencil at a 45˚ angle to remove the excess mixture and to make the shape clear. Repeat over the rest of the baking sheets to get a lot of little wings. (You’ll need two per bee, but some will break so always make more than you need).
  17. Pre-heat the oven to 140˚C. Bake your tuiles for 5-8 minutes until just starting to brown at the edges. Leave to cool completely and then transfer to a wire rack until needed.
  18. Once the Catalan cream has set, sprinkle a little caster sugar over the exposed cream so it’s covered. Then, using a blowtorch, lightly brush the sugar with the flame until golden and caramelised. Leave to set for a few minutes before turning the ring over and repeating on the other side so both ends of the bee are set with caramel. Repeat for all your bees.
  19. Now start plating – you can do this on any shape of plate but I find rectangle or round works well. Remove your bee from it’s ring, peel off any clingfilm and place it on your plate. Take a sharp knife and make two small incisions into the cake near the top – these will be the holes for your wings. Take two relatively similarly sized wing tuiles and insert them into the holes you just made.
  20. Next make the trail behind the bee. Spoon the lemon curd into a piping bag or bottle and squeeze little dots in a swirl across the plate- this swirl will be the template for the rest of your garnishes. Take your little lemon pieces and place them along the swirl. Then take a teaspoon and sprinkle little piles of sesame seeds and freeze-dried raspberries along the same shape. Finish off with some fresh mint leaves and some broken bits of tuile to garnish. Serve!

Thanks for reading!
Emma x

 

Midsummer Night’s Dream Dessert

Midsummer Night’s Dream Dessert

The next post in my book themed month is based on A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare! This book/play has long been one of my favourites and so I couldn’t wait to make a dessert to reflect it. I first read the play at school and I instantly loved all the imagery, wit and chaos that goes on, as well as the magical themes running through the whole story. I’ve tried to capture this magic and fun in this dish, as well as use floral and summery flavours to complement the themes and title of the play.

This dessert is made up of elderflower and raspberry Mousses on a peach marshmallow, with a meringue ring and a raspberry coulis to serve. I’ve also decorated the plate with lots of lovely flowers from m’ garden for aesthetic. I should point out that these aren’t all edible, so if you have similar ones in your garden please don’t assume you can eat them! This will take a bit of time to make so if you’re in a hurry you could buy marshmallows and meringues from a shop, and then serve them with the two mousses and coulis to make a fancy eton-mess-type-thing.

Recipe

Serves 4

Time: 3 hours, plus setting time

Ingredients

For the Meringue

  • 3 Egg whites
  • ½ tsp Cream of tartar
  • A few drops of Lemon juice
  • 230g Caster sugar
  • Orange food colouring

For the Marshmallow

  • Oil for greasing
  • 100g Icing sugar
  • 50g Cornflour
  • 10 Gelatin leaves
  • 280ml Peach juice
  • 425g Caster sugar
  • 15g Liquid glucose
  • 2 Large egg whites

For the Elderflower mousse

  • 2 Gelatin leaves
  • 90ml Milk
  • 2 Small Egg yolks
  • 10g Caster sugar
  • 8g Cornflour
  • 2 tbsp Elderflower cordial
  • 200ml Double cream

For the Raspberry mousse

  • 2 Gelatin leaves
  • 2 Eggs, separated
  • 80ml Double cream
  • 40g Caster sugar
  • 150ml Raspberry puree

For Plating

  • Raspberry coulis
  • A few Edible flowers
  • A sprinkle of Edible glitter
  • A Few mint sprigs
  • Popping candy

Method

  1. Begin by making the meringue rings. Pre-heat the oven to 180˚C and line two baking trays with baking paper.
  2. Take a 5cm ring/cookie cutter and draw round it onto the baking paper to get 12 rings. Then turn the paper over so these pencil marks are on the underside.
  3. Put the egg whites into a super clean metal or glass bowl. Add the lemon juice and cream of tartar and whisk up with an electric whisk until they form soft peaks.
  4. Add the sugar one tbsp at a time, whisking constantly, until it’s all incorporated and the mixture is stiff.
  5. Put a pipping bag with a small, round nozzle into a glass or beaker to hold it upright. Take the food colouring and brush it down either side of the inside of the bag. Fill the bag with the meringue mixture and twist the top of the bag to create some tension.
  6. Pipe blobs of the meringue onto the baking paper in a ring, using the circles you dew earlier as a guide.
  7. Bake the meringues in the oven for 10 minutes, then lower the temperature to 140˚C and bake for another 20 minutes until the meringue is dried out and hasn’t started to brown. Turn the oven off and leave the meringue to cool in the oven to prevent them from cracking.
  8. Now move onto the marshmallow. Grease a 20x30cm tin with oil. Then line it with clingfilm and grease the clingfilm lightly.
  9. Mix the icing sugar and cornflour in a bowl and dust the tin with the mix.
  10. Take the gelatin and put it into a bowl with some cold water. Then leave it to soak for 5 minutes until soft.
  11. Next squeeze out the gelatin and put it into a pan with 100ml of the juice.  Stir the mixture constantly over a medium heat until the gelatin has dissolved. Keep warm but don’t let simmer.
  12. Now put the sugar, glucose and the rest of the juice into a large pan and put over a high heat. Stir the mix until the sugar has dissolved (you shouldn’t be able to feel the crystals scrapping the bottom of the pan).
  13. Leave the mixture to boil, using an electric thermometer to check the temperature, you want to bring the mixture up to 110˚C.
  14. Meanwhile put the egg whites into a very clean metal or glass bowl. When the sugar/juice mix hits 110˚C start whisking the whites until they hit soft peaks.
  15. When the sugar/juice mix reaches 121˚C start to pour it into the egg whites, whisking continuously. Try to avoid pouring it onto the beaters or you’ll end up with spun sugar!
  16. Once it’s all incorporated pour the gelatin mix into the marshmallow and continue to whisk for 5-10 minutes until the mix has cooled completely and is stiff.
  17. Pour the mixture into the lined tin, dust it with more of the cornflour mix and leave it to set completely, it’ll take about 2 hours.
  18. Now make the elderflower mousse. Put the gelatin in a bowl with some cold water and leave to soak until soft (about 5 minutes).
  19. Put the milk into a saucepan and bring to the boil.
  20. Meanwhile put the egg yolks, sugar, cornflour and elderflower into a bowl and whisk until smooth and pale.
  21. Pour in the milk whilst whisking until fully combined. Then pour the custard mixture back into the pan and whisk over a medium heat until the mixture thickens. Pour the custard into a bowl and leave to cool completely.
  22. Pour the cream into a bowl and whisk until it forms soft peaks. Fold the cream into the cooled elderflower custard and pour this into a pipping bag with a small round nozzle. Leave the mousse in the fridge until needed.
  23. Now make the raspberry mousse. Leave the gelatin to soak in a bowl of cold water. When it’s soft squeeze the gelatin and put it into a small pan. Add 1 tbsp cold water and put over a medium heat. Stir until the gelatin has dissolved, then set to one side and keep warm.
  24. Put the egg whites into a clean metal or glass bowl and whisk until stiff peaks form.
  25. Then pour the cream into a bowl and whisk until soft peaks form.
  26. Next put the sugar and egg yolks into a bowl and whisk with an electric whisk for a couple of minutes until pale and fluffy. Stir in the raspberry puree and the warm gelatin mix.
  27. Fold the cream into the main mixture until it’s all incorporated. Then fold in the stiff egg whites, ½ at a time, until it’s all folded together and there’s no flecks of white.
  28. Pour the mousse into another pipping bag with a small round nozzle and leave in the fridge for at least 3 hours until it can be piped, or until needed.
  29. When you’re ready to plate start by spooning (or piping) a dot of the coulis into the centre of the plate. Then take a large, round, flat lid or plate and press straight down on into the coulis. Lift the utensil up and a pattern should appear. Alternatively you could just flick or dot the coulis around the plate if you’d prefer.
  30. Then cut a 5cm circle of marshmallow and put it onto the plate, I like it when it slightly offsets the coulis shape but it’s up to you. Pipe alternate blobs of the two mousses over the marshmallow and top it all off with one of the meringue rings.
  31. Decorate the plate with the edible flowers and mint and then dust it all off with the edible glitter and the popping candy.

Thanks for reading!

Emma x

Mirror Glaze Chocolate Gateau  

Mirror Glaze Chocolate Gateau  

I’m back to what I really love making – complex patisserie! Being the massive baking nerd that I am I love making things like this that take ages but look really cool once finished. This gateau is mirror glazed, which is a kind of icing that has a gorgeous reflective finish. I always find something really elegant about mirror glazed things and when done right they can look really professional. They also have this deceptive, exterior simplicity to them which is broken when they’re cut into and all the layers, colour and textures pour out, like the doors being opened to a vibrant party.

The trick when making something like this is just to take your time and to not rush any of the steps. I actually made this one over three days, partly because I was a bit busy and so I was making elements whenever I had some free time. This meant that I could leave each element to set completely which was really useful for when it came to assembling, although it would also be possible to make this in a single day if you wanted to.

Recipe

Serves 10

Time: 3 1/2 hours plus lots of chilling

Ingredients

For the Brownie

  • 55g Butter
  • 70g Dark chocolate
  • 1 Medium egg
  • 70g Caster sugar
  • 15g Plain flour

For the Jelly

  • 200g Frozen Strawberries
  • 1 tbsp Lemon Juice
  • 50g Caster sugar
  • 2 1/2 Leaves of Gelatine

For the Crispy layer

  • 100g Cornflakes
  • 50g Milk chocolate

For the Mousse

  • 3 1/2 Leaves of Gelatine
  • 175g Milk chocolate
  • 175g Dark chocolate
  • 220ml Milk
  • 350ml Double cream

For the Glaze

  • 150ml Double cream
  • 135g Caster sugar
  • 60g Cocoa powder
  • 3 Leaves of Gelatine

To Decorate

  • 2 Fresh strawberries

Method

  1. Begin by making the brownie. Pre-heat the oven to 180˚C. Grease and line a 12.5 cm round tin with butter and baking paper.
  2. Put the butter and chocolate into a glass bowl over a pan of gently simmering water and leave to melt.
  3. In another bowl whisk the eggs and sugar together until pale and fluffy. Pour in the chocolate mixture and stir together until smooth. Add the flour and mix it in until everything is combined.
  4. Pour the brownie mixture into the lined tin and bake in the oven for 10-15 minutes until a crispy top has formed and the cake is still a little gooey. Take the cake out of the tin and then leave it to cool until needed.
  5. To make the jelly put the strawberries, lemon juice and sugar into a pan and bring to the boil. Then leave to simmer until the sugar has dissolved and the strawberries have become a mush (about 15 minutes).
  6. In another bowl leave the gelatine to soak in some cold water for 5 minutes, until it’s soft and flexible.
  7. Blend the strawberry mix into a puree with a hand blender and then add the gelatine to the warm mixture. Stir until the gelatine is completely dissolved and then leave to cool.
  8. Line a 12.5 cm round tin with cling film and then pour the cooled jelly mix into the tin. Leave to set in the fridge for at least 3 hours or until needed.
  9. Next make the crispy layer. Melt the chocolate in a heatproof bowl over a pan of simmering water.
  10. Pour the melted chocolate into a bowl with the cornflakes and mix everything together until the flakes are completely coated in the chocolate.
  11. Line a 12.5 cm round tin with clingfilm again like you did with the jelly, and then tip the cornflake mixture into the tin. Even the layer out with a spoon so that it’s relatively flat. Then leave to cool/set and leave to one side until needed.
  12. When everything’s ready (the brownie, jelly and crispy layer) you’re ready to make the mousse. Put the gelatine into a bowl with some cold water and leave to soak.
  13. Finely chop the chocolate until it’s the texture of a broken up ice cream flake. Then transfer the chocolate to a bowl.
  14. Heat the milk in a pan until it reaches a boil. Take the pan off the heat, squeeze the gelatine to remove excess water and then stir it into the milk until dissolved. Then pour the warm milk over the chocolate to melt it and stir to make sure it’s smooth. Set aside to cool.
  15. Pour the cream into a bowl and whisk until soft peaks form. When the chocolate mix is completely cool, fold the whipped cream into the mixture until the colour is even and the mixture is smooth.
  16. Line a 17.5 cm tin with clingfilm. Pour a little of the mousse mixture into the lined tin so that it just covers the base. Leave the tin in the fridge for 30 minutes to set this layer.
  17. Once set, carefully place the jelly layer in the centre of the entremet. Then top the jelly layer with the brownie and then the crispy layer. Pour the rest of the mousse over the layers so that they’re completely covered. Then leave everything in the fridge to set for at least 4 hours, or better overnight.
  18. When ready make the glaze. Put the cream, sugar, cocoa and 150ml water into a pan and heat gently until the sugar dissolves. Bring the mixture to the boil and then leave for 2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and leave to cool slightly.
  19. Soak the gelatine in a bowl of cold water for about 5 minutes, until flexible. Squeeze out the excess water and then add the gelatine to the glaze and stir to dissolve.
  20. Cool the glaze down to 38˚C and then it’s ready to use. This can take a while so I’ve found that transferring it into another bowl and whisking it every so often will help! Sieve the glaze to make it super smooth.
  21. Unmould your gateau and place it on a wire rack with a large roasting tin underneath to catch the excess glaze that will drip off. Then pour the glaze over the cake so it evenly covers the gateau. Leave the gateau for 30 minutes to allow the glaze to set slightly.
  22. Quarter your strawberries and then place them around the top of the gateau. Serve!

Thanks for reading!

Emma x

Mint Choc Chip Ice Cream

Mint Choc Chip Ice Cream

If you’re in the UK right now you’ll be aware that it’s really hot, and it doesn’t look like it’s going to change anytime soon! Whilst I’m all for a sunny day or two, I’m actually one of those weirdos who love storms and the rain, so I can’t wait for this heat wave to move on and for a good storm to come rolling in. In the meantime though it’s ice cream and shorts all the way! My favourite ice cream has to be a good mint choc chip. The kind that’s refreshing, tickles the tongue and has big, bittersweet nuggets of chocolate floating through it. Unfortunately where I live they don’t sell mint choc chip (shock horror!) The only place that I found something resembling mint ice cream was in the Aldi near where I work, and whilst I’m a normally big Aldi fan, their mint choc chip ice cream could do with some serious tlc. So, desperate times call for desperate measures, time to make my own!

Loads of people say they hate mint choc chip as a flavour because it reminds them of toothpaste, but to me that’s really glass-half-empty kind of thinking. To me toothpaste tastes of mint ice cream! A bit weird, I know, but it makes some sense. By using fresh mint in this ice cream the whole thing tastes a lot more deep and rounded than the shop bought stuff. You get a really strong, authentic mint flavour and none of the synthetic, weak mint you come across in cheap ice cream. If you’re one of the above people who hates mint ice cream you can easily make this vanilla or plain choc chip by just not infusing the milk with the mint. You can also vary how much chocolate goes in depending on your preference. Personally I like a mixture of flakes and hearty chunks, but you can chop the chocolate however you want to suit your style.

Recipe

Makes 1 tub

Time: 30 minutes, plus chilling time

Ingredients

  • 215g Dark chocolate
  • 450ml Whole milk
  • 250ml Double cream
  • 1 tbsp Vanilla bean paste
  • 30g Fresh mint
  • 4 Large egg yolks
  • 140g Caster sugar
  • Ice cream cones to serve (optional)
  • Flakes and sprinkle to decorate (optional)

Method

  1. Chop the chocolate into small chunks. Then put them into a container and leave in the freezer until needed.
  2. Pop the milk, cream, vanilla and mint into a pan and bring to the boil.
  3. Reduce the heat to the lowest temperature and leave to simmer/infuse for 20 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile put the egg yolks and sugar into a bowl and whisk together until pale and smooth.
  5. Strain the milk mixture through a sieve to remove the mint, then pour the warm milk over the egg mixture, whisking constantly to combine.
  6. Then pour this mixture back into the pan and place over a medium heat, whisking constantly until the mixture thickens.
  7. When the mixture thickens, remove it from the heat and leave to cool completely.
  8. Once the mixture is at room temperature pour the mixture into an ice cream maker, working to the device’s instructions. If you don’t have an ice cream maker see note below.
  9. When the ice cream is ready, add the chocolate chunks to the ice cream and mix them through. Then pour the ice cream into a freezer-proof tub, smooth over and leave in the freezer to freeze completely.
  10. Once frozen serve with sprinkles and flakes in cones or in bowls!

 

Note: If you don’t have an ice cream maker, add the chocolate chunks to the ice cream mix and stir them in. Then pour the mixture into a freezer-proof tub with a lid and leave in the freezer for 2 hours. Every 10-15 minutes take the ice cream out and give it a stir. This will help with the crystal formation and will make the ice cream smooth as it sets. After the two hours leave the ice cream to set completely in the freezer.

Thanks for reading!

Emma x

Sumac and Pistachio Meringues with Pomegranate

Sumac and Pistachio Meringues with Pomegranate

Those of you who follow my Instagram will know that I had an incredible meal at The Vanilla Pod restaurant in Lynton a few weeks ago. When I was there one of the specials was a sumac meringue with rhubarb and pistachios. Whilst I went for a different, but equally delicious feta cheesecake for dessert (which I’ll be adapting and re-creating soon!), I knew this was something I wanted to try out for myself when I got home.

Sumac is a tangy spice used in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern cooking. Traditionally it’s used in savoury food, but the combo of the sumac with the sweet meringue and the pistachios is to die for (no exaggeration). This is also super easy to make, the hardest bit is just the meringues and the trick with them is just to make sure everything is spotlessly clean before you start and to whisk for a really long time. So if you’ve got something coming up which you want a cool, inventive dessert for, this is the one for you! These meringues will also store for a really long time in an air tight tin, so if you have some left over egg whites from something else you can whip them up and then bung them in a box till you need them.

Recipe

Serves 8

Time: 45 minutes, plus cooking time

Ingredients

  • 4 Large egg whites (130g)
  • 260g (Double the weight of your egg whites) Caster sugar
  • 40g Salted pistachios, roughly chopped, plus extra to garnish
  • 2 tbsp Sumac
  • 400ml Double cream
  • A handful of Pomegranate seeds
  • 100g Fresh raspberries

Method

  1. To get set up pre-heat the oven to 140˚C and line two baking trays with baking paper. Then wash a metal or glass bowl and two electric whisk beaters with lots of soap and warm water to make sure they’re spotless (any fat on these utensils will stop the meringue for puffing up).
  2. Weigh the egg whites into your bowl and note down the weight. Then, using an electric whisk, whisk the egg whites until they hit a stiff peak. Now add the sugar, 1tbsp at a time, to get a stiff meringue (about 8 minutes), you want to add in double the weight of the egg whites in sugar.
  3. Add the chopped pistachios and 1 tbsp of the sumac, and then carefully fold them into the meringue with a large metal spoon or spatula.
  4. Now spoon the mixture into 8 small mounds on your lined baking sheets. Take a spoon and make them into wells by pushing the meringue up the sides slightly.
  5. Sprinkle the meingues with a little more sumac and then bake in the oven for an hour, until crispy but still white. Turn off the oven and leave the meringues to cool in it. When cool the meringues will store in an air tight tin for up to 3 weeks.
  6. When ready to serve, whip the cream with a whisk until it just holds its shape. Crush half the raspberries, and then mix them into the cream to get a ripple and then dollop it into the wells of the meringues. Scatter the pomegranate seeds over the cream and finish with the rest of the fresh raspberries, a few chopped pistachios, and a sprinkle of sumac.

Thanks fore reading!

Emma x